Why You Need Managed Service

As your business grows, the needs of your IT department change. At some point, depending on that rate of growth, a decision will need to be made towards simplifying some of the processes used to keep your productivity in check. Managed services might provide the support needed to handle the problems that exceed what your department can handle or they may simply add depth to an overworked department.

Regardless of the rationale, there are many services available that can make your business even more productive and efficient than it is already. Knowing when to make that decision to get Managed Service solutions for your business is the important part. There are several different services that can really be a lifesaver for a stressed out, overworked IT department.

Here are a few examples of what can be offered:

IT Service Management & Delivery Automation
True client partnerships are our main focus, incorporating the “always available” domestic delivery model. It is this core method that provides flexibility, cost reductions and helps build, integrate and support the next wave of operational transformation.

Data Center & Security Solutions
Infrastructure management solutions give order, efficiency and cost effectiveness inline with advances in technology. Managing, sharing, accessing and protecting data defines your business with the help of a true information technology partner that helps you maintain that competitive edge that separates the leaders from the followers.

Cloud Solutions
In this ever-changing landscape, being “traditional” just won’t be enough. A cloud management solution that is fully integrated with public, private and hybrid cloud architectures will put you in the driver seat. The best part of having this tool at your disposal is that it’s accessible from a single portal and managed through one pane of glass, enabling you to take control of the information efficiently, under one managed services umbrella. This will create the optimal mix of performance, reliability, cost and security for you.

DevOps & Software Development
DevOps is a managed service that assists development teams and businesses that want to run applications in the cloud. Working closely with your developers and in-house architects is critical to successfully leveraging the benefits that the cloud offers. This ensures that your environment runs effectively, efficiently and smooth.

When a client leverages managed services into their business, it’s not utilized solely for peace of mind. Freeing up your IT Department’s time to devote to core tasks brings an added dimension that puts you in a better position for continued growth. Outsourcing top-notch security and uptime can be a cost saving measure that provides big results.

It doesn’t matter which industry you are in, almost any business can benefit from managed services because it will help them achieve their objectives in a more timely manner. By giving the IT staff more time to focus on innovation and reducing unexpected costs, managed services provides you with the support your business needs to thrive.

Basic Practice Management Systems

A real insight is required to get into the medical practice management and how it performs. Medical office managers take on a number of issues, including administrative, legal, financial or even technological and sometimes all of these in the same day. This type of workload is not feasible to be handled by any one person. For this reason, there is a need of PMS. This system with cloud-based platform delivers unparalleled visibility into every practice on your network. The medical practice management tracks progress drives improvements and optimize results.

What are the responsibilities of your staff?

  1. Custom Benchmarking – Establish benchmarks for your practice based on the performance of other practices of your size, specialty or geographic regions.
  2. Applied Network Learning – By monitoring the network of providers, will get to know what helps your practice to thrive and can implement those tactics at your organization.
  3. Proactive Reviews and Coaching – Use specific medical practice management metrics to track your success, and analyze trends in your practice to pinpoint ways to increase collections, improve office efficiency and more.
  4. Visibility into our Entire Network – We can track the performance of practices throughout by network. Have the ability to share the best practices for practice management. This transparency produces real-time understanding about your performance. This way, be able to track your progress and quickly make improvements.

Practice Management Services that align with your successGetting the providers to pay is not just the task, rather than charging a substantial monthly or software fee. Any billing company can directly invest in your success by charging a small percentage of collections.

As a plan to self-regulate a medical practice’s revenue cycle, the right practice management system (PMS) is the key to achieving the potential efficiencies offered by electronic transitions and workflows. Medical billing software usually automates and streamlines practice’s administrative and billing functions. PMS software should typically have the ability to capture patient demographics, schedule appointments; should also be able to pre-register patients and determine patient financial responsibility for collections at the point of care. Should also maintain insurance payer lists, perform billing and generate reports.

The cloud-based practice management service will have your financial well-being in mind. There are low up-front costs (no paying for software licenses, installations or upgrades). There is no fee for disruptive updates. It is an easy transition without any need of costly add-on modules.

Intelligent, Streamlined Practice Management Services

A smart, streamlined workflow is essential for any medical practice. Choosing and integrating an appropriate, well supported PMS can be daunting. Choose a billing company that delivers a 5-stage workflow for staff to swiftly move through patient visits, with efficiencies from check-in through check-out. When administrative workflows smoothly, providers can focus on the patient in front of them. The information about the patient is collected up front in the practice management workflow so the claims go out as cleanly as possible, and it takes up less time for the billing process. Thus, when administrative workflows smoothly, providers can focus on the patient in front of them.

Ruby On Rails For VPS Server

If you’ve outgrown Heroku’s “free” tier, it’s likely that you’ll want to examine the various ways you’re able to create a private VPS to run any Rails apps you may have.

In order to do this, you should really be looking at the various “cloud” hosting providers (such as Digital Ocean, Linode, etc) who have now started to offer inexpensive VPS hosting onto which you’re able to deploy custom web based applications.

Since Rails is one of the cornerstones of modern web development, it’s important to consider how to set up a private server to run it. It’s actually quite simple.

99% Software…

The most important thing to remember with this is that to set up an HTTP (“web”) server, you ONLY require SOFTWARE to get it working.

The “web” works off the back of TCP/IP (the underlying “protocol” for the “Internet”) – which basically says that if you know the “public” IP address of a computer system, TCP/IP gives you the ability to attempt to “connect” to it.

Each time you “ping” a system, or perform any sort of “handshaking”, it’s done through TCP/IP. This works in both a LAN (Local Area Network) and WAN (Wide Area Network) capacity, providing users with the ability to “connect” to other devices that are “connected” to the Internet.

The problem with TCP/IP is that whilst *every* system that’s “online” can be “pinged”, it cannot be accessed. TCP/IP uses “ports” which basically allow for particular data to be transferred in certain ways – firewall software (which is now built into most operating systems) block access to most ports, to prevent hacking.

The part where HTTP (Hyper Text Transfer Protocol) plays here is that it allows for a “public” set of connectivity – delivered through port 80 (or 443 if using SSL). ANY “HTTP” enabled computer system essentially “opens” a certain folder to the Internet, making it accessible via port 80 of the TCP/IP protocol. This is done with “HTTP” (“Web”) server software.

To run a “web server”, you basically need a computer that’s connected to the “Internet”, has a publicly accessible IP address and is able to accept incoming requests via the HTTP protocol on either port 80 or 443.

This is the beginnings of how you set up a custom VPS server…

Servers Are A Dime-A-Dozen

Thus, anyone with an Internet connection, computer and HTTP server software (NGinx/Apache) can setup a web server.

You don’t even need a domain name – just use your public IP. Domain names are provided by ICANN as a way to make it easier to access web servers – what most don’t know is that a “domain” name simply routes a request to particular IP address. It’s still incumbent on the domain owner & website developer to make that IP accessible to “web” traffic (port 80/443).

The point is that what you pay for “hosting” is really the infrastructure required to keep a server running & operational. “Shared” hosting is basically the ability to buy a “user account” on a HUGE server (used by 1,000’s of websites), whereby the “hosting company” will pay for all the electricity, maintenance and support to ensure maximum uptime.

The problem for most people is that whilst “shared” hosting is a great way to get a simple “WordPress” website online, if you want anything more exotic, you’re at a loss. Specifically, Rails and the likes of NodeJS or other “new” technologies (which require deeper OS integration for their dependencies).

The answer to this (for now) is to set up your own VPS servers. These allow you maximum control over the way in which the server works, and also gives you direct access to the underlying operating system (which means you’re able to add as many dependencies as you want).

To do this, however, takes some setting up. This is done by firstly understanding the core settings / components required to get the server running & online. The following steps will explain how to do this.

Setting Up a Server

  1. VPS Running Ubuntu
    The first step is to get a VPS instance. As mentioned, the best providers of these are the new “cloud” systems such as Vultr, DigitalOcean, AWS, etc. Don’t worry about paying huge money for this – $5/mo is perfect to start with. You also need to use an operating system which is widely supported and not going to add unnecessary expense. Use Linux. You’re never going to look at the server after you’ve set it up, so a costly Windows license won’t matter anyway. Ubuntu is currently the most popular Linux variant. Whilst you could use others, we just recommend Ubuntu for the sake of compatibility.
  2. Install NGinx/Apache
    Next, you need to install the *web* server software. This is what will open port 80 (or 443) to the world, and allow people to connect to the server with their web browser. It must be noted that you’ll also need to install the “application server” with the web server, which typically comes bundled as one package. Both NGinx & Apache have their respective methods of achieving this, which are available on their websites.
  3. Install Ruby & RubyGems
    After you have installed the web server, you need to get Ruby/RubyGems installed. Whilst there are a number of ways to do this, the underlying basis is to build Ruby from source (which requires the build tools) and to install RubyGems on top of it.
  4. Get GIT Set up
    The way you get a Rails application onto the server is with GIT. To get this set up, you need to first download the GIT application (which is done through apt-get), and then add a custom (“bare”) GIT repository on the server. You then need to set up your local repository to handle the GIT remote repo, which should allow you to push to it.
  5. Push The App & Get Any Extras Set Up
    After this, you need to ensure that you are able to push the app to the server via GIT, and then add any extras (such as a database etc). Obviously, how you do this will be dependent on the “stack” setup that you have.

Ultimately, the process is actually quite mundane, and exactly the same as the myriad of “hosting” providers out there.They just use an application such as CPanel or Plesk to ensure that users are able to “manage” their various features properly.

 

Things About Crypto Currency You Should Know

“Crypto” – or “crypto currencies” – are a type of software system which provides transactional functionality to users through the Internet. The most important feature of the system is their decentralized nature – typically provided by the blockchain database system.

Blockchain and “crypto currencies” have become major elements to the global zeitgeist recently; typically as a result of the “price” of Bitcoin skyrocketing. This has lead millions of people to participate in the market, with many of the “Bitcoin exchanges” undergoing massive infrastructure stresses as the demand soared.

The most important point to realize about “crypto” is that although it actually serves a purpose (cross-border transactions through the Internet), it does not provide any other financial benefit. In other words, its “intrinsic value” is staunchly limited to the ability to transact with other people; NOT in the storing / disseminating of value (which is what most people see it as).

The most important thing you need to realize is that “Bitcoin” and the like are payment networks – NOT “currencies”. This will be covered more deeply in a second; the most important thing to realize is that “getting rich” with BTC is not a case of giving people any better economic standing – it’s simply the process of being able to buy the “coins” for a low price and sell them higher.

To this end, when looking at “crypto”, you need to first understand how it actually works, and where its “value” really lies…

Decentralized Payment Networks…

As mentioned, the key thing to remember about “Crypto” is that it’s predominantly a decentralized payment network. Think Visa/Mastercard without the central processing system.

This is important because it highlights the real reason why people have really began looking into the “Bitcoin” proposition more deeply; it gives you the ability to send/receive money from anyone around the world, so long as they have your Bitcoin wallet address.

The reason why this attributes a “price” to the various “coins” is because of the misconception that “Bitcoin” will somehow give you the ability to make money by virtue of being a “crypto” asset. It doesn’t.

The ONLY way that people have been making money with Bitcoin has been due to the “rise” in its price – buying the “coins” for a low price, and selling them for a MUCH higher one. Whilst it worked out well for many people, it was actually based off the “greater fool theory” – essentially stating that if you manage to “sell” the coins, it’s to a “greater fool” than you.

This means that if you’re looking to get involved with the “crypto” space today, you’re basically looking at buying any of the “coins” (even “alt” coins) which are cheap (or inexpensive), and riding their price rises until you sell them off later on. Because none of the “coins” are backed by real-world assets, there is no way to estimate when/if/how this will work.

Future Growth

For all intents-and-purposes, “Bitcoin” is a spent force.

The epic rally of December 2017 indicated mass adoption, and whilst its price will likely continue to grow into the $20,000+ range, buying one of the coins today will basically be a huge gamble that this will occur.

The smart money is already looking at the majority of “alt” coins (Ethereum/Ripple etc) which have a relatively small price, but are continually growing in price and adoption. The key thing to look at in the modern “crypto” space is the way in which the various “platform” systems are actually being used.

Such is the fast-paced “technology” space; Ethereum & Ripple are looking like the next “Bitcoin” – with a focus on the way in which they’re able to provide users with the ability to actually utilize “decentralized applications” (DApps) on top of their underlying networks to get functionality to work.

This means that if you’re looking at the next level of “crypto” growth, it’s almost certainly going to come from the various platforms you’re able to identify out there.